Workers at Tinker Air Force Base bracing for more cuts as shutdo

Workers at Tinker Air Force Base bracing for more cuts as shutdown looms

Posted: Updated:
OKLAHOMA CITY -

After taking six furlough days this summer due to the sequester, civilian workers are Tinker Air Force Base are bracing for more bad news. Some employees will be sent home Tuesday, if the federal government shuts down.

"People are concerned. [I'm getting] a lot of calls. They're worried about if this is going to mean going home without pay," James Schmidt, the president of the American Federation of Government Employees Local 916, said.

AFGE Local 916 is the union for Department of Defense workers at Tinker AFB.

"It's demoralizing. Most people that come to work for the federal government do it out of patriotism and also the stability," Schmidt said. "The stability has been taken away over the past four years."

All workers will need to show up to work as normal, but then they could be presented with furlough notices, Schmidt said.

Related: Government shutdown countdown: what's impacted in Oklahoma

Schmidt said he is disappointed with leadership in Washington, DC for putting his union members on the line, again.

"They should take federal employees off the table. I think it's really unfortunate that they're willing to sacrifice us and our families, just to get their way. Whether you believe in the Affordable Care Act or not, I don't think shutting down the government is the answer," Schmidt said.

Schmidt worries the furlough on Tinker AFB workers will have a bigger effect on Oklahoma as a whole.

"A lot of people think... 'let it shut down. It's not going to affect me at all.' But it will. All the small business around the area will be affected, just like they were when we had our six day furlough earlier this year," he said. "It did not take long for all of the business to realize how much it would affect their bottom line."

If the shutdown happens, working capital fund workers will not be affected, unless the shutdown lasts longer than five days. At that point, Schmidt said those workers could also be sent home.

Related: Senate passes bill to ensure military pay in event of shutdown

Professor of economics at UCO, Dr. Sue Lynn Sasser agrees furloughs could hurt our economy.

"Generally a day or two, people can absorb that and we've seen that with the furloughs... certainly anything that starts extending past three or four more days can be very detrimental for families and then that is detrimental to the economy," she said.

Sasser said about 60-percent of the economy is driven by consumers. If they continue to act as normal, she said there should be no effect on the economy. She said Oklahomans should relax and keep in mind that a shutdown would likely not last very long.

"Everybody needs to realize that our economy is based on faith and confidence. When people start to lose confidence in the overall economy, the overall government, the overall structure of the people that are involved in making the decisions, then that has a negative impact," Sasser said.

  • Top StoriesMore>>

  • Clinic veterans call a "life-saver" in danger of closing by end of the week

    Clinic veterans call a "life-saver" in danger of closing by end of the week

    Thursday, July 24 2014 11:20 PM EDT2014-07-25 03:20:27 GMT
    FOX 25 highlighted the Patriot Clinic in S. Oklahoma City in our military town hall meeting in May. Patients of all kinds go there to get a prescription to use hyperbaric oxygen treatment for a number of illnesses and injuries. 
    FOX 25 highlighted the Patriot Clinic in S. Oklahoma City in our military town hall meeting in May. Patients of all kinds go there to get a prescription to use hyperbaric oxygen treatment for a number of illnesses and injuries. 
  • "Botched" execution in Arizona familiar issue in Oklahoma

    "Botched" execution in Arizona familiar issue in Oklahoma

    Thursday, July 24 2014 10:42 PM EDT2014-07-25 02:42:11 GMT
    An all too familiar case is raising more questions about death penalty procedures Oklahoma and across the country.The Arizona Department of Corrections said Thursday Joseph Wood's execution was not botched. Officials say Wood was comatose during the two hour ordeal Wednesday. They say noises witnesses described as gasping and struggling for breath, was actually Wood snoring.Witnesses said something was clearly wrong.Related: Controversy brews over drawn out execution in Arizona"It was tough f...
    An all too familiar case is raising more questions about death penalty procedures Oklahoma and across the country.The Arizona Department of Corrections said Thursday Joseph Wood's execution was not botched. Officials say Wood was comatose during the two hour ordeal Wednesday. They say noises witnesses described as gasping and struggling for breath, was actually Wood snoring.Witnesses said something was clearly wrong.Related: Controversy brews over drawn out execution in Arizona"It was tough f...
  • Teachers begin preparing classrooms for new standards

    Teachers begin preparing classrooms for new standards

    Thursday, July 24 2014 10:35 PM EDT2014-07-25 02:35:16 GMT
    Across Oklahoma classrooms, new standards are on the way. As teachers throw out old plans, there are question about what teachers should get ready for in the coming days.State superintendent Janet Barresi says at least a portion is up to your local district."The real curriculum that is how they are taught, is determined by the teacher in their classroom or by the school," Barresi said.Barresi says the state standards will transition off common core starting this year and teach the PASS standa...
    Across Oklahoma classrooms, new standards are on the way. As teachers throw out old plans, there are question about what teachers should get ready for in the coming days.State superintendent Janet Barresi says at least a portion is up to your local district."The real curriculum that is how they are taught, is determined by the teacher in their classroom or by the school," Barresi said.Barresi says the state standards will transition off common core starting this year and teach the PASS standa...
  • More HeadlinesMore>>

  • Gallup survey: majority of Americans opposed to lowering drinking age

    Gallup survey: majority of Americans opposed to lowering drinking age

    Thursday, July 24 2014 6:40 PM EDT2014-07-24 22:40:36 GMT
    When it comes to the drinking age, the vast majority of Americans don't want to go back to the future.
    When it comes to the drinking age, the vast majority of Americans don't want to go back to the future.
  • Maine prepares for new work requirement people who receive food stamps

    Maine prepares for new work requirement people who receive food stamps

    Thursday, July 24 2014 4:00 PM EDT2014-07-24 20:00:42 GMT
    It's a federal law that hasn't been enforced in Maine since the recession. But Governor LePage and the Department of Health and Human Services will soon start enforcing work requirement for able-bodied adults who collectively get $15-million dollars a year in food stamps. More than 200,000 people in Maine currently receive food stamps to help feed themselves or their families.
    It's a federal law that hasn't been enforced in Maine since the recession. But Governor LePage and the Department of Health and Human Services will soon start enforcing work requirement for able-bodied adults who collectively get $15-million dollars a year in food stamps. More than 200,000 people in Maine currently receive food stamps to help feed themselves or their families.
  • 116 passengers and crew missing in Air Algerie flight

    116 passengers and crew missing in Air Algerie flight

    Thursday, July 24 2014 11:28 AM EDT2014-07-24 15:28:48 GMT
    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) -- Authorities say a flight operated by Air Algerie carrying 110 passengers and a crew of six has disappeared from the radar on a flight from Burkina Faso to Algiers.
    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) -- Authorities say a flight operated by Air Algerie carrying 110 passengers and a crew of six has disappeared from the radar on a flight from Burkina Faso to Algiers.
  • FOX25 Slideshows

  • Contact your Oklahoma lawmakersMore>>

  • Senator Jim Inhofe

    Senator Jim Inhofe

    Wednesday, September 25 2013 4:42 PM EDT2013-09-25 20:42:11 GMT
    U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) is the senior senator from Oklahoma and was first elected to the Senate in 1994. He is a ranking member of the Committee on Armed Services.
    U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) is the senior senator from Oklahoma and was first elected to the Senate in 1994. Prior to winning the Senate seat, he represented Oklahoma's 1st District in the U.S. House of Representatives.
  • Senator Tom Coburn

    Senator Tom Coburn

    Tom A. Coburn, M.D. was elected to the U.S. Senate on November 2, 2004. Prior to his election to the Senate, Dr. Coburn represented Oklahoma's Second District in the House of Representatives from 1995 through 2001.
    Tom A. Coburn, M.D. was elected to the U.S. Senate on November 2, 2004. Prior to his election to the Senate, Dr. Coburn represented Oklahoma's Second Congressional District in the House of Representatives from 1995 through 2001.
  • Representative Jim Bridenstine

    Representative Jim Bridenstine

    Representative Jim Bridenstine (R) represents Oklahoma's First District which includes Tulsa. Rep. Bridenstine was elected in November 2012 and began his first term in officer in 2013.
    Representative Jim Bridenstine (R) represents Oklahoma's First District which includes Tulsa. Rep. Bridenstine was elected in November 2012 and began his first term in officer in 2013.
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by 

WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KOKH. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.