Danlin Employees Prepare To Return to Work

Danlin Employees Prepare To Return to Work

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A community west of the metro, shaken up by an explosion at an chemical plant, is moving forward. This as the Oklahoma Fire Marshal's Office tries to determine how the explosion could have happened.

The plant that serves as the main headquarters for Danlin Industries in Thomas, Oklahoma, caught fire Wednesday night. By Thursday morning, the plant was destroyed.

"We're just going to keep moving forward and get back to normal," company C.O.O Mike Brown told FOX 25.

Brown said the company has begun the cleanup process and plans to rebuild in Thomas.

"We were able to move forward very quickly. We secured the scene. We had no injuries- that as the main thing was no injuries at all. We're working that way and hopefully we'll have little to know environmental impact," Brown said.

The cause of the fire us still unknown.

Investigators with the Oklahoma Fire Marshal's Office inspected the damage Friday morning.

"They basically start from the least amount of burn and work to the most severe amount of burn and try to determine where the fire actually started," Sam Schasnitt, the chief of operations at the State Fire Marshal's office said.

The investigation was delayed by a day while hazmat crews worked to determine the air quality was safe. Schasnitt said there should be some word on the cause by Monday.

"Well, you have a 70,000 square foot building and you're trying to find the cause of the fire so it takes a while to go through 70,000 square feet," he said.

There should be no safety concern to residents after this explosion, though Schasnitt said people should remain off this property.

Danlin Industries has locations in 40 cities across the U.S. It manufactures chemicals used on oil fields.

"The oil and gas industries are very large to western Oklahoma," Brown said.

The company said there should be no disturbance in service as the investigation and rebuilding goes forward.

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