Could Your Facebook Photo Be Used in a Product Ad?

Could Your Facebook Photo Be Used in a Product Ad?

Posted: Updated:
Facebook is proposing a new policy that allows your photo be used in ads. Facebook is proposing a new policy that allows your photo be used in ads.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- A proposed Facebook policy that would allow your picture to be used in a product or store's ad on the social media site without your knowledge has privacy groups united in opposition.

Executives from six public interest groups on Wednesday signed a joint letter to the Federal Trade Commission asking that the agency act to stop Facebook's privacy and data use policies proposed by the company last week.

"Facebook users who reasonably believed that their images and content would not be used for commercial purposes without their consent will now find their pictures showing up on the pages of their friends endorsing the products of Facebook's advertisers," said the letter. "Remarkably, their images could even be used by Facebook to endorse products that the user does not like or even use."

Facebook reached a $20 million settlement last week in a class action suit brought by those who argued it did not have enough privacy protections in place. It said the new policy was in response to that settlement. It said it would listen to comments over a 7-day period that ends Thursday, and that it would consider feedback before adopting the changes.

In response to questions about the objections, Facebook said Thursday that it has not changed its ad practices or policies, and that it is only making things clearer for people who use the service. It said it wants to make clear that you are granting Facebook permission for this use when you use its services.

But Jeffrey Chester, executive director for the Center for Digital Democracy and one of the signers of the letter, said the new policy opens the door for even greater user of user's data.

"It requires 'Alice in Wonderland' logic to see this as anything but a major setback for the privacy rights of Facebook users," said the group's letter. The group is particularly upset because it said it makes it easier to use the images of minors who use the site.

Chester said Facebook unveiled the new rules on the eve of the Labor Day holiday in hopes it could be put in place before the FTC and public had a chance to object. But the comments from users at the bottom of the page announcing the changes were overwhelmingly negative.

"Send me ads, fine. Use my photos or posts in ads, I'm out of here," wrote Margo Kelly, one of the Facebook users posting a comment.

Among the other groups whose executives signed the letter are the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.

  • Top StoriesMore>>

  • Oklahoma musician shares message of hope through instruments deemed broken beyond repair

    Oklahoma musician shares message of hope through instruments deemed broken beyond repair

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 10:41 PM EDT2014-07-31 02:41:27 GMT
    “Seeing a broken violin is nothing new to me,” Kyle Dillingham said turning to the shelf of those violins waiting for repair. “They’re all over the place, this is a pretty bad break,” he said pulling out a violin with gaping hole in its shell.  Sometimes a ‘bad break’ is just that for the instrument. Those violins where the repair cost exceeds the replacement value are deemed ‘broken beyond repair.’
    “Seeing a broken violin is nothing new to me,” Kyle Dillingham said turning to the shelf of those violins waiting for repair. “They’re all over the place, this is a pretty bad break,” he said pulling out a violin with gaping hole in its shell.  Sometimes a ‘bad break’ is just that for the instrument. Those violins where the repair cost exceeds the replacement value are deemed ‘broken beyond repair.’
  • Family Matters: Pharmacy mix-ups

    Family Matters: Pharmacy mix-ups

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 10:41 PM EDT2014-07-31 02:41:09 GMT
    Medical mistakes are now the third most common cause of death in the U.S., ahead of breast cancer, AIDS, even car crashes. And a big part of that number comes from mix ups at the pharmacy.It's a mistake that happens more frequently that you might think. Just last week, medication for my family was mistakenly filled at a metro pharmacy with an entirely different drug. We were mistakenly given a generic drug for high cholesterol. "That shouldn't happen, but it does," said Cindy Hamilton, compli...
    Medical mistakes are now the third most common cause of death in the U.S., ahead of breast cancer, AIDS, even car crashes. And a big part of that number comes from mix ups at the pharmacy.It's a mistake that happens more frequently that you might think. Just last week, medication for my family was mistakenly filled at a metro pharmacy with an entirely different drug. We were mistakenly given a generic drug for high cholesterol. "That shouldn't happen, but it does," said Cindy Hamilton, compli...
  • Audit reveals problems in state Dept. of Corrections

    Audit reveals problems in state Dept. of Corrections

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 9:43 PM EDT2014-07-31 01:43:30 GMT
    Money management, computer problems, and massive under-staffing are all problems outlined in a 40-page audit on the state's Dept. of Corrections. 
    Money management, computer problems, and massive under-staffing are all problems outlined in a 40-page audit on the state's Dept. of Corrections. 
  • FOX25 Slideshows

  • FOX 25 FeaturesMore>>

  • Tell Me Something Good

    Tell Me Something Good

    Tired of all the bad news? Looking for some good news? Tell Me Something Good, does just that! FOX 25's Mike Brooks finds the good in Oklahoma and tells you all about it.
    Tired of all the bad news? Looking for some good news? Tell Me Something Good, does just that! FOX 25's Mike Brooks finds the good in Oklahoma and tells you all about it.
  • Waste Watch

    Waste Watch

    How are your tax dollars being spent? FOX 25 Waste Watch tracks whether local, state and federal governments, or any groups, are using your money wisely... or wasting it.
    How are your tax dollars being spent? FOX 25 Waste Watch tracks whether local, state and federal governments, or any groups, are using your money wisely... or wasting it.
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by 

WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KOKH. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.