Polygraph crusader under federal investigation

Polygraph crusader under federal investigation

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OKLAHOMA CITY -

For the past four decades a former police officer has been fighting the very tool he used on those suspected of crimes. "I literally scared the hell out people with this little machine," said Doug Williams, "But it's not a lie detector."

Polygraph expenses questioned and experts defend their use.

Williams turned from polygraph examiner to polygraph crusader. His testimony before Congress helped end the practice of private companies using polygraphs as a condition of employment.

"They can call you a liar they don't have to offer any evidence whatsoever to back up the allegation there is no appeal from their decision and it's based on a faulty scientific principle," Williams told Fox 25.

Williams has written manuals and conducted training to teach people to beat the polygraph. He says his training can help anyone get over the fear of the machine and produce a perfect result.

"I do not, and will not, knowingly assist anyone to lie or train anyone to lie," Williams said, "But by far the majority of people who are called liars are innocent and truthful people that are falsely branded as liars simply because they are nervous. It has a built in bias against a truthful person."

A recent report by McClatchy Newspapers revealed Williams and another anti-polygraph crusader are under federal investigation for teaching techniques that beat the test.  Williams has not been charged with any crime.

"You have to know that someone is going to take a test and that they are going to take a test in a certain way and they're not going to tell the truth," said Fox 25 Legal Analyst David Slane.

Slane said any investigation would have to prove someone knowingly taught a person to lie with the intention of fooling federal investigators.

That is something Williams says he has never done. Though he makes no apologies about his work to expose what he calls "faulty science." "Liars don't need my training, they can pass easily it's a game to them." Williams said.

Williams said federal investigators should instead be focused on finding the root cause of recent high-profile security leaks. "Get off your ass and go investigate," Williams said, "Do a background investigation; do what they did before they go lazy and relied on this damn thing."

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